Wednesday, 26 November 2008

flex, cocomo and the diablo iii fansite kit

It has been a while and lots of things have been happening. I'm still working away on the first implementation of DataEye which should go live any day now.

I have also managed to create a set of bundles which allow Flex Remoting via AMF3 in a pure OSGi environment (i.e. no BlazeDS). However, they are not a replacement for BlazeDS, they are just something different and provide no "data services" to speak of, other than allowing developers to register their OSGi services and then access them from their Flex applications. A sample application will be provided. Once I get the thumbs up from the lawyers and my boss I intend to release them, so watch this space.

Since I couldn't sleep this evening (I have only been in my new house less then a month and things are still a little strange) I decided to see how Diablo III was progressing. I am really looking forward to this game. I noticed they had a Fansite Kit available for download, so I took a look. I didn't intend to build a fansite, I'm not a web designer, but I have been looking for an opportunity to play with Adobe's Cocomo SDK and see what it is about.

The result is the linked page. http://diabloiii.brindy.org.uk/

Cocomo is really simple and seems to be very comprehensive in the things it lets you do. My application is really just a simple Flex application with no server back end. All the server stuff is provided by the "connectnow" service at acrobat.com (http://connectnow.acrobat.com/).

The only things I don't like about it are the examples aren't really good examples of best practice approaches and even goes against some of the things Adobe says not to do (lots of containers within containers) and the other thing is to do with containers directly. Adobe seem to love them and seem to love inheritance as an approach to specialism. I prefer composition over inheritance, and while there's a bit of that in there too, what you end up with is a complicated mess of container hierarchy, models and so on.

But really, if you're used to Flex, this won't be a shock, so don't let it put you off!

I am thinking that Cocomo combined with the the Facebook API for Flex that I found here might be very interesting...
http://code.google.com/p/facebook-actionscript-api/